Category: Adult Therapy

Intergenerational Trauma, PostPartum Anxiety and their after effects

It’s Maternal Mental Health Week and I’m feeling the call to be vulnerable and brave to talk about Intergeneration Trauma, PostPartum Anxiety (PPA) and their after effects. 

This is a bit of a vulnerable post for me since I’ll be self-disclosing more than usual, perhaps more than other traditional therapists are used to. At the same time, I’m making a choice to discuss this very important topic because it’s super important for me to destigmatize mental health and bring light to the importance of intergeneration trauma especially as it pertains to maternal mental health. 

I’m literally typing this at the airport, about to depart for a wonderful vacation to celebrate my best friend’s wedding. The reason this is important is because I almost had a panic attack last night as I was trying to get some sleep, ready to leave early in the a.m. today. You see, the apple of my eye, my 5 year old daughter had just fallen asleep and she was breathing heavily. I wondered if I should have given her Benadryl since she had a small hive on her cheek at bath time. “It might have cleared her sinuses too” I told myself. We still co-sleep (another ball wax I’m not going to get into right now), so I laid down next to her and she moved a little, now sleeping on her stomach. About 5 minutes passed and I realized I couldn’t hear her breathe anymore. “How is that possible, I just heard her have somewhat of a stuffy nose?” “Is she breathing?” My mind jumped right back to her being a newborn, when I suffered from Post Partum Anxiety and would check her breathing constantly. I put my hand on her back to feel her breathe, feel it go up and down, but nothing. I couldn’t tell if she was breathing. I started to panic. I immediately shook her to wake her up. She let out a very annoyed, “whaaaaaat, mommy? No. Let me sleep.” Never have I been so grateful for her little annoyed tone and words. She was certainly breathing and alive, and thankfully, went right back to sleep.

So am I an overprotective, anxious mom? Yes. Absolutely.

While that’s true. I also want to interject and share a little about the intergenerational trauma I was exposed to and why these intrusive thoughts about my daughter’s breathing is so important. My mother is from El Salvador, one of the smallest Central American Third World countries. When she had her first child in the 1970’s, the infant mortality rate was extremely high (thankfully since then it has decreased significantly). Her first baby girl died as an infant. That was super traumatic for her, since for much of my mom’s life up to that point was also plagued by extreme poverty, her father’s alcoholism, losing her own mother at 12 years old, as well as experiencing the death of her youngest twin siblings. The male twin died during infancy. The female twin died at 6 years old. She too was the light of my mother’s eye and she watched her get very sick and die. A few months later, her own mother would also die a painful cancer death. 

This is my mother’s trauma. And although I didn’t experience these things directly. I experienced being parented by a single mother with so much grief, trauma, sense of helplessness and vacillating fears that robbed her from experiencing complete joy, bonding, trust, and positivity.

When I gave birth to my baby girl, I was incredibly happy to hold this perfect little person, whose cries were immediately comforted by my voice (she recognized it right away). Eventually though, after leaving the hospital, I started to have these intrusive thoughts that I too would lose my first child; my first baby girl. I had the fear that I would be destined to suffer the exact same grief my mother did. So I developed different ways to check for my baby’s breathing. I’d watch her back or belly go up and down (of course, every 15 minutes or so). I wasn’t sleeping at all. Even when family members or my husband would send me to sleep, I couldn’t. That was when the intrusive thoughts were loudest and the pounding of my heart was unbearable. I was a wreck. I didn’t trust anyone with her. I was relieved when I was alone with her because I knew that I could give her my undivided attention. This isolation came at an expense though. Once I peed on myself because I didn’t want to put her down when she was crying.

At the time, I had been a child therapist for about 5 years. And I was pretty certain I knew the signs of post partum depression, post partum psychosis, and even post partum OCD. I had neither of those. I knew I had suffered from PTSD since childhood — some episodes more intense than others, but I chalked what I was going through to normal anxiety, especially when you’re certain that you know the outcome. I had this intense tunnel vision focused on the destiny I was set to have. “I mean, doesn’t everyone worry that their child is going die and stop breathing? What do I do if she stops breathing?” “You call 9-1-1” the nurse calmly told me. I couldn’t figure out why everyone was so calm about it. It was because I had post partum anxiety (complicated by PTSD and intergeneration trauma) and they didn’t. I mean, I’m assuming.

In getting to know intergeneration trauma, I want to quote Lost in Transmission: Studies of Trauma Across Generations, edited by M. Gerard Fromm (2012) as they define it as “what human beings cannot contain of their experience—what has been traumatically overwhelming, unbearable, unthinkable—falls out of social discourse, but very often on to and into the next generation as an affective sensitivity or a chaotic urgency.” That means that I saw how my mother reacted (cried, obsessed over, expressed fears/paranoia, etc) to her trauma and it was transmitted to me, causing me to react anxiously to it as well. And it’s true. I’ve always been an empath, being super sensitive to the energies around me. I’d developed this strong intuition about people’s suffering (us therapists become therapists for a reason) because I’d been doing it since childhood for various reasons. And when I gave birth, not only was I dealing with this delusional destiny, but I also had some health complications as a result of my pregnancy. It was all compounded.

I didn’t speak much of this to many people. A part of me (the overachieving, “I got this” part of me) was thinking that it was no big deal. Another part of me had this idea that this is what new motherhood was — a big worried mess. But perhaps the biggest part of me was influenced by “Marianismo” or what others refer to as the “Maria Complex” where Latina women/mothers are seen as martyrs. A Long Beach based maternal mental health colleague of mine, Susana Marquez, LMFT shares this about Latinas and Postpartum Anxiety: “Postpartum anxiety impacts Latinas culturally and religiously. It creates feelings of unworthiness and shame due to our culture having such strong ties with the Catholic religion and mothers being seen as martyrs or La Virgen Maria. They carry more shame if they have negative feelings about motherhood because we are not supposed to since our mothers and abuelas did it all and never complained. The feelings of isolation, judgement and criticism are perpetuated if a mother shares her thoughts. Creating more isolation and more sense of disconnect from culture religion and motherhood.” Damn, Susana, where you in April 2014 when I needed you? She hit the nail on the head.

So what did I do? I didn’t go to therapy right away. I had a bunch of friends who were therapists/mothers who I reached out and talked to (Angela, Victoria, Loan, Farah). Their stories of PPD (Postpartum Depression) and motherhood helped a lot. Momma friends also helped a ton. It helped tremendously that my sister gave birth three days after me, although she was in another state, the late night texts and conversations were my saving grace. Long Beach Littles founder Hazel Quimpo who had given birth to her baby boy Miles 6 weeks before me, would also become a hallmark support and great friend. It was because of Hazel that I’d leave the house for lunches, walks at El Dorado Park, free swimming lessons for the babies, and really just another person who understood the struggle of #teamnosleep.

I received a lot of support from my daughter’s pediatrician. She was always receptive to my questions, google knowledge (or lack thereof, lol), and assuaging a lot of my fears. She knew when to explicitly tell me “do not google this” and never made me feel like I was an idiot for bringing my daughter in or my list of questions.

My husband was a great partner, especially when I told him that I still needed more support, professional support. Eventually, I decided to seek therapy for the PPA (postpartum anxiety) and CT (complex trauma). It was there that I realized that we couldn’t tackle one without the other. The generational trauma experienced by my ancestors and mother would come to influence my DNA. The ghosts in the nursery were telling this story of poverty, death, trauma, but also resiliency. The treatment I received was heavily focused on asking/receiving help, acknowledging and validating the pain I held because of the traumas, separating and individuating, and self-care (“do you even know how to relax?” -yes, my therapist really asked me this).

I’ve also received great training in Maternal Mental Health by the organization Maternal Mental Health NOW. More than ever, I now know that the big ticket items is creating a strong support network and treatment.

Finally, I want to shout out to the heavens and to all you mamas who might be going through something similar, please get help. Talk to someone you trust. Talk to someone online. Talk to someone on the street, at the grocery store, someone! I promise you you’re not alone. You and your baby deserve relief, healing, and safety.

References / Resources

https://knoema.com/atlas/El-Salvador/topics/Demographics/Mortality/Infant-mortality-rate

How Trauma is carried through generations. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-me-in-we/201205/how-trauma-is-carried-across-generations https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-me-in-we/201205/how-trauma-is-carried-across-generations

Find Susana Marquez at: www.wellnessparalamama.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/wellnessparalamama or Facebook: Wellness para la mama

Maternal Mental Health NOW

Mom & Mind Podcast

LatinX Therapy and Podcast

Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health

*Disclaimer: Please note that this post is strictly for education and  does not replace medical and professional help. I strongly encourage that you engage in therapy or speak with their medical professional about any of these ideas. If you find yourself in a medical emergency where you or a loved one is a danger to themselves or others, you are strongly urged to call 9-1-1 or go to your nearest emergency room. The National Suicide Hotline number is: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). In Los Angeles County, you can also call the Department of Mental Health’s Psychiatric Mobile Response Team – Access Hotline at 1-800-854-7771.

Grieving after an Affair

Janis Abrahms Spring, Ph.D wrote the amazing guide book, “After the Affair” (this is an affiliate link) for couples struggling after an affair. She is able to break down such complex dynamics that occur in a relationship and/or in an individual when an affair occurs. She labels the partner who didn’t cheat as the “hurt partner” and I love that she does so because underneath the anger, frustration, rage and other emotions, at the very core it is hurt that they are experiencing. Spring points out that these partners are not only going through betrayal, but also a sense of loss of self when a partner cheats. In this short article, I want to focus on the marvelous job she did with highlighting the losses that can come up for many hurt partners when there has been infidelity (but seriously, go get the book. I don’t do this topic the justice Dr. Abrahms Spring does). Additionally, I’d also like to point out that partners are  not the only ones who experience grief and pain when there is infidelity, children of partners who engage in adultery might also experience a lot of these losses when they find out about it. I’ll add my ideas about children’s reactions to each identified loss.

The following are 9 losses that Janis Abrahms Spring highlights:

# 1: Loss of Identity. When people first find out that their partner has been unfaithful a typical response is to feel as though they have lost a part of their identity or basic sense of who they are. For example, if a someone believed that we were the sun and the moon to their partner, or completely respected by them, an affair can trigger lots of confusion about who they think their partner is, and consequently, who they are to their partner. “If you are not who I thought you were and who I believed loved and respected me, then who am I to you?”

#2: Loss of Sense of Specialness.  Similarly to #1, a loss of sense of specialness can occur as well. An affair can signify a major discrepancy in what the partner thought they had in a “happy marriage” or union. It can mark a betrayal of sacred vows and “oneness” that are hallmarks in committed relationships. Additionally, for children, an affair can also be interpreted as the parent “not loving us enough” and betraying the whole family, not just the partner.

#3: Loss of Self-Respect for debasing and compromising self for the relationship. In this loss, some people might feel as though they lost self-respect due to comprising their worth by engaging in extreme behavior non-typical to win the offending partner back or keep the relationship from ending. Examples can include, changing their appearance to win their partner back (extreme weight loss, wearing different types of clothing, or excessive exercising to lose weight).

#4: Loss of Self-Respect when denying signs of Infidelity.  After an affair is out in the open, the hurt partner may start having flashbacks about red flags they denied or even knowing that the affair was taking place, but did nothing about it, confront it or turn a blind eye. Someone experiencing this should know that from a trauma perspective, this makes sense since your brain is trying to protect you from experiencing pain, therefore avoidance of a very painful fact can be quite common. For children, they may take on the burden of keeping this “secret” if they know or feel as though they are responsible to “fixing” the problem. Tip: when talking to children about this, always make sure to they hear from the adult that what adults do is never their fault. Adults are responsible for their own actions, even though those actions might not always be right.

#5: Loss of Control over own thoughts and actions. This is a big one for anyone after experiencing betrayal in a relationship. You might be feeling out of control with your thoughts going a mile a minute or experiencing flashbacks of memories or images of the betrayal. Having a partner who has cheated can be very traumatic for many. Therefore, a normal reaction of the body after experiencing a traumatic event is for it to get ready to fight or flee. Because the body might be trying to protect you and getting you ready to “fight or flee” you might be experiencing body aches, insomnia, paranoia about your partner’s whereabouts (or who they are talking to), sadness, muscle tension, feeling physically ill (headaches, stomach aches, pounding heart, hot flashes). Abrahms Spring highlights even having thoughts of revenge or acting in ways that are not typical for you might come up. In children, we see that when they are going through a stressful time, they will act out physically with peers, are highly irritable, and even withdraw from peers.

#6: Loss of sense of Order/Justice. For some, an affair can trigger a sense that there is no order or justice in the world. Lots of “should” thoughts/statements might come up, such as, “I’m a good person. This should not have happened;” “This isn’t  fair;” “I kept my vows. There is no justice in this world;” “Why do bad things happen to good people? I’m a good person.” “How unfair that I will never love or trust again.”

#7: Loss of Religious Faith. Piggy backing from #6, some people might also begin to feel a loss of religious or spiritual faith. Spring recalls some of her clients saying, “If God loves me, how could he do this to me?” It is normal for someone experiencing betrayal to question fairness and justice, especially from a higher power during such a devastating time.

#8: Loss of Connection with Others. Because some people might be struggling with shame, embarrassment, fearing ridicule, or even extreme guilt, they might be withdrawing from close family and friends. Abrahms Spring does a really great job of highlighting what loved one of the couple might be going through when they hear about the affair. She normalizes the loss of connection with others either due to the hurt partner’s isolating themselves while they deal with these losses, or even because sometimes loved ones simply don’t know what to do or how to respond to such a crisis. Although, she also points out that the hurt partner might also be withdrawn from others due to holding this secret in and even protecting their partner who cheated. This point applies to children as well since they too can attempt to protect parents during times of grief. They might also feel disconnected because they are as they are probably not engaging very much with family or friends due to parents staying away from functions.

#9: Loss of sense of Purpose. The last loss she mentions is the loss of sense of purpose. When the grief is most severe, she highlights that some people might spiral into a deep depression where they questions their sense of purpose and finding it hard to live with the pain of the betrayal. If you or someone you feels as though “living feels more painful” it’s a big sign that professional help might be needed.

I strongly urge everyone who is grieving after an affair to pick up the book, “After the Affair.” It’s comprehensive and non-judgmental. It’s completely revolutionized the way I think about affairs and has helped me understand the complicated dynamic that occurs before, during and after infidelity.

As with any type of grief, it’s important that we acknowledge the feelings that come up during difficult times and talk to people who understand what this process is like. Having your emotions validated and normalized can make a world of difference in your healing process.

Resources:

If you feel triggered by this article and are in need of some immediate resources, I urge you to contact:

  • 911 or go to your nearest ER if you feel you a danger to yourself or others
  • 211 – in LA County it’s the social service directory for grief groups, therapy resources, housing, and more. It’s also online, google, “211”
  • LA County Access hotline for a psychiatric evaluation wherever you are located. The ACCESS/HOTLINE Phone number is : 1-800-854-7771. ACCESS operates 24 hours/day, 7 days/week as the entry point for mental health services in Los Angeles County.
  • Email me at info@sofiamendozalcsw.com if you’d like to inquire about an appointment with me in the Long Beach area. I can also help connect you to other therapists if you live elsewhere.
  • If you would like to access your insurance mental health benefits, there should be a Member Phone number on the back of your insurance card. Ask them for their list of approved therapists. They can also email it to you, making it easy to cross reference the list on www.psychologytoday.com where you can check their profiles out.

Thank you for reading. Follow me on Instagram under @mendingrootstherapy to get updates about new articles, quotes and other musings on mental health.

*Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com. You should also know that I stand by my recommendations as I read or use everything I recommend. The fees earned from Amazon.com go toward purchasing more books and materials used in my practice. 

Self-Sabotage

A few weeks ago a colleague and I bonded over discussing Rumi, the 13th Century Persian Poet-Scholar. She has been studying Rumi with members of her Persian community and I have been introduced to his writings and poetry through my personal study on Acceptance and Healing. We (and millions of others) were drawn to Rumi’s words and poems because he captures the essence of emotions through several written gems. I call them gems because when I read them, they illuminate an experience in me that perhaps has been hiding under denial, pain, or masked by other emotions. Uncovering pain is also a gem to me because it highlights how much someone cares and how much their values mean to them.

Earlier this week, she lent me the book, “Silent Words” with hundreds of pages of poems and pieces by Rumi. I flipped through a few pages and found the following gem. “Fearfully, I was stealing from my own gold.” In the poem, Rumi is expressing his experience with doubting his wise friend and spiritual instructor, Shams. By doubting and challenging his wisdom, Rumi says, “Fearfully, I was stealing from my own gold.” It’s that cringe-worthy memory that shows up any time you realize, “‘so and so’ told me this would happen. ‘So and so’ was so right about this and I didn’t listen. The doctors told me this would happen, etc, etc.” I’m sure we could come up with hundreds of scenarios that get triggered by this gem. “Fearfully, I was stealing from my own gold.” I swear, the more times I say it and write it out, the more powerful it becomes. To me, this message and gem is about Self-Sabotage and how at times, we create barriers for the life we want to live.

I define Self-Sabotage as engaging in behaviors or thoughts that move us away from our goals, values, happiness, progress and ultimately, well-being. Giving in to negative thoughts and core beliefs also contribute greatly to Self-Sabotage. What’s important to know about giving in to deeply ingrained negative thoughts and core beliefs is that more times often than not, they are wildly inaccurate. We might have adopted a negative self view of ourselves as children or other painful experiences in which we might not have had a complete perspective, control, or facts and we internalize them as an absolute truth. Giving in to those thoughts and core beliefs takes away from our happiness. It’s stealing from our own gold!

Self-Sabotage and “stealing from your own gold” is also behavioral. For me, it entails those times in which I overeat in an unhealthy way. It entails crossing my own boundaries, such as overworking, over-committing, procrastination, or convincing myself that I don’t need exercise or a day off. I think any fellow workaholic can relate to this.

For others it might be not following a medication regimen, skipping out on doctor appointments, not meeting deadlines, or poor work performance. It means doing things that get in the way of self-care, progress or happiness.

The role of self-sabotage in relationships can be significant. It might look like an inability in trusting others (who are safe to trust), engaging in inappropriate, unbalanced or unhealthy relationships, having unhealthy boundaries, or even avoiding connections.

Stealing from your own gold also encompasses suppressing or over acting on emotions in an ineffective way, which can cause problems in your work, school, or home life. This might look like yelling or lashing out in the workplace; threatening others; not asking for help; or having unfair expectations of others — including loved ones co-workers, teachers, or the general public.  Engaging in such behaviors can cause problems for us in reaching our goals. It can impede 1) having a good relationship with our child’s teacher; 2) being evaluated well in our performance evaluations; 3) having a serene home environment.

One of my favorite sources of research and inspiration is this little cataloging website called Pinterest.com. When I did a search for self-sabotage it pulled up an overwhelming selection of quotes and messages. Among the best in describing self-sabotage were:

  • “Don’t stand in your own way.”
  • “Get off your but.”
  • “Self-sabotage is about wanting something so bad and making sure it doesn’t happen.”
  • “She didn’t know who would leave or stay. So she pushed them all away.”
  • “I’m afraid of what I’m doing to myself, but I can’t seem to stop.”
  • “Stop hurting yourself because you are angry at someone else.”
  • “Do not sabotage your new relationship with your old relationship’s poison.”
  • “We accept the love we think we deserve.”

Impressive and overwhelming list of quotes right? I know. They resonate with a feeling of dis-control that’s linked to hurtful experiences, and actions that we engaged in. I know.

So what do we do about self-sabotage? Below is a list of different recommendations and techniques that I have found to be extremely helpful in identifying self-sabotage and chipping away at it. By no means do I think that these are easy tasks. You should know that it can be a painful process in the beginning, especially if hurtful memories or trauma comes up for you. And some days might be better than others for you to be able to turn your cycle in the opposite direction.  However, please don’t underestimate yourself and your capacity for self-kindness and resilience. (*I also want to be clear that I recognize the role of systemic and societal barriers on our psychology and negative thought process. That conversation, however, is a much more complicated topic and post that, well, yes, I will have to write in the future. You have my word.)

Breaking the Cycle of Self-sabotage
  1. Recognize and acknowledge your self-sabotaging thoughts or behavior. This is a pivotal first step in making a change. Identify your behavior that is getting in the way of a goal you have for yourself.
  2. Observe the negative thoughts that are going through your mind. You can write them down if you want. Think about those one-liners that go through your mind as soon as you decide to go in the direction AWAY from your goal. What are you saying to yourself, about yourself, about others, the situation, the future?
  3. Challenge or evaluate these specific, situational thoughts. Think of evidence for and against it. Is there a more positive way in which you can think of this? Are you taking into consideration ALL perspectives? Are you being unfair with yourself? What would you be saying to yourself if you were being kinder? Or better, what would you tell someone close and who you love if they were in your shoes? Is the thought related to a fact? If it is, evaluate how HELPFUL or USEFUL  the this thought or fact is in your life? Just because it might be true, does not mean you have to adopt it and live your life according to it. Write the new, more positive, true and feel-good thoughts on a card, write in on your Notes app, or take a picture of it and look at it repeatedly for daily reminders. Make a pinterest board out of them (I swear, I’m not affiliated or get paid by Pinterest).
  4. Make a commitment to doing one thing, one action that’s in the direction of your goal. Even if it’s small. In fact, the smaller, the better because it’s more likely to be attainable.

These are small, yet meaningful steps that you can take to break the cycle of self-sabotage. If you’re finding yourself having a difficult time following these steps, go ahead and google ‘Cognitive Behavioral Therapy’ (or go to www.academyofct.org), or even on Amazon. There are tons of amazing self-help books on changing thoughts, feelings and behaviors — all related to defeating self-sabotage and negative thinking.

I think it’s only fair that I also share with your some quotes from Pinterest that to me, help with reversing the Cycle of Self-sabotage. Among my favorites are:

  • “Slay your stress monster”
  • “When you let go, we create space for better things to enter your life.”
  • “I will not feel deprived when I bypass junk food, I will feel empowered that I made a healthy choice”
  • “Remember that you are doing the best you can in THIS moment.”
  • “You are worthy, You are worthy of love, happiness and your own forgiveness.”

Feel free to follow me on Instagram @mendingrootstherapy for inspirational quotes and other musings on mental health and wellness.

Lastly, if you would like a free 15 minute consultation to discuss your situation and if you would benefit from individual therapy, feel free to email me at info@sofiamendozalcsw.com.

Helping Professionals and Burnout

It takes a special person with a great deal of compassion and heart to be in any of the helping professions. Here I’m talking about (although not limited to) social workers, therapists, nurses, doctors, caregivers, first aid and crisis responders, etc. Being a helping professional can be incredibly rewarding, while at the same time, emotionally taxing which can cause burnout. Pines and Aronson (1988) defines burnout as “a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion caused by long-term involvement in emotionally demanding situations.” Burnout is characterized by three essential features: “emotional exhaustion, depersonalizations (general feeling of detachment, either personal or with reality), and feelings of ineffectiveness.”

Those who directly deal with responding to trauma or healing trauma, can also experience a state that is called Compassion Fatigue due to secondary or vicarious trauma. Compassion fatigue – is “a state of tension and preoccupation with traumatized patients by re-experiencing the traumatic events, avoidance/numbing… And persistent arousal associated with the patient.
Symptoms of burnout and compassion fatigue can include (and not limited to):
• Poor work performance, excessive absence, lack of interest in the work
• Emotional withdrawal from co-workers, dehumanization, or over-intellectualizing
• Sleep difficulties, fatigue, frequent illness (cold or flu)
• Irritability, anxiety, depression, guilt, helplessness
• Nightmares, anxiety, fear responses
• Poor concentration, self-doubt, fixation on traumas, confusion

Contributing factors associated with chronic burnout and compassion fatigue:

Ineffective coping such as poor self-care, substance abuse, and other risky behaviors.
Helping professional with a history of their own untreated personal trauma(s)
No sense of control over their work or helping those they work with
Lack of good supervision and/or administrative support.
Increasing job demands
Lack of training
Occurrence or Reoccurrence of psychiatric episodes of depression, anxiety, PTSD etc.
Increase in physical ailments or illnesses such as coronary heart diseases, imbalance of stress and cortisol levels.

Therapy can help you process the feelings that come up from being the holders of hope for your clients. A common symptom of working with people in challenging situations is not even having the words to express what it is we’re feeling. And put simply, emotions can be contagious. Helping professionals are highly at risk of feeling what others feel. In part, it’s what draws us to the profession. It’s also what can put us at such high risk for burnout.

You can take a self-test here to see where your compassion fatigue and burnout measures.

I have experience with being a direct mental health service provider for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health and can relate to the increasing demands of such a highly regarded and utilized system of care. I also have experience with providing clinical supervision to case managers, therapists, social workers and psychologists and am passionate about addressing their burnout and compassion fatigue.

Together we can assess your level of burnout and/or compassion fatigue and come up with a personalized self-care plan, assertiveness practice and if necessary, healing of your own traumatic experiences.

You can start this journey by calling me at (323) 351-1741 for an appointment.

If you’re looking for self-study, the following books are highly recommended to help you understand burnout and compassion fatigue for helping professionals.

 

*Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. You should also know that I stand by my recommendations as I read or use everything I recommend. The fees earned from Amazon.com go toward purchasing more books and materials used in my practice. 

Mental Health Gift Guide to Inspire Healing 2019

It’s officially the holidays and with that can come with gift giving, stress and trauma triggers for many. Since the …

10 Important Parenting Tips to Help Children Comply

Parenting is both hard and rewarding at the same time. The hardest parts are when our children aren’t complying, we …

Teaching Kids Empathy

On the heels of two mass shootings this weekend in the U.S., a slew of traumatizing immigration reform acts, and a lifetime …