Category: What to say

Latinx Therapy Campaign: “Mental Health, it’s like the air that we breathe”

Today, I want to introduce you to the first ever National Latinx Campaign to reduce mental health stigma in the community. I am so thankful to Adriana Alejandre, LMFT for starting Latinx Therapy Podcast and the Latinx Therapy website/directory. The campaign’s mission is to 1) break the stigma of mental illness, 2) encourage our community to heal layers and generations of trauma, and ultimately, 3) focus on wellness as a community.

Check out the video that’s buzzing around the internet and feel free to share with family and friends. It’s in English and Spanish. Feel free to use the words that we use to state why breaking the mental health stigma is so important to us.

My statement was: “Because mental health is like the air that we breathe.” I chose this analogy because mental health is all encompassing and made up of our thoughts, feelings and actions. If we are in a negative state of mind, it informs everything we do. Just like if we are breathing in toxic air, it will impact and inform every aspect of our being. Our mental health is the same. When it’s on a decline, our suffering goes up. Getting treatment for your mental health can make the difference in your perspective, growth, healing, and quality of life. You deserve to heal.

Visit www.latinxtherapy.com for more information about the podcast and a directory of Latinx Therapists.

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‘First Gen’ Compassion To-Say List

The term “First Gen” has become both a compassionate term of endearment and a resounding validation of experience. First Gen refers to First Generation – being the first in the family become a naturally born citizen in the United States. In my office, it also means First generation to take A.P. classes in high school, go to college, and/or become a professional. The experience of First Gens is a unique one that many can’t relate to which can leave First Gens feeling alone, misunderstood, with an incredible pressure to succeed in every life domain, and an underlying fear of being an imposter through it all. Today, I’m focusing on the themes that have come up in my First Gen therapy sessions, clinical supervision, and heart-to-hearts with the comadres and how compassion heals.

I take a radically open approach that incorporates acceptance and self-compassion. In my opinion, these are the hardest skills and concepts to continually practice, and yet, they’re the best ones for ultimate healing. The concept of the to-say list came from my First Gen clients. First Gen Professionals love them their To-Do lists. It’s what got them through high school AP classes, college and thriving in their professions. I #jokenotjoke that Self-Compassion and Acceptance skills need to be permanent items on the Daily To-Do list, and to add a dramatic flare, in the morning, noon, and night rows!

Acceptance as a skill is super important because one is accepting reality (whether current or in the past) as it is, “tal y como es.” This might mean accepting the emotion or struggle you’re experiencing. Acceptance helps in reducing our suffering because once we accept and let go of the struggle, we remove the internal tension and effort it takes to deny, avoid, or fight against it.

Self-compassion is the right hand to Acceptance in that, when used, it will save the day in a way that provides genuine self-comfort and validation. It should not be confused with praise or affirmations stating you’re “Amazing and gorgeous, strong beyond measure who can rock any hurdle that comes along.” It is a genuine effort to remind yourself of everything you’ve been through while taking it easy on yourself. It’s acknowledging that what’s hard is hard and you’re worthy of love and healing. I tell my clients that self-compassion is like giving yourself the same gentle care that you would to a hurt child, kitty or puppy who is scared, hurt and tattered. You would likely (if you’re a child or animal lover) clean the injuries up very gently, speak in a kind and low tone, and walk them through exactly what’s going to help heal them (putting this medication/ bandaid on you, taking you to the doctor, I know it hurts. I know you’re scared. Let’s feed you some food and help heal you).

Check out the First Gen Compassion To-Say List below and see if any resonate or are useful to you. I started with a validation statement. Threw our parents’ struggle in there, along with a little something on Love Languages. There’s a nod to the other side of “being independent” and asking for help. Imposter syndrome also makes an appearance, along with helping behavior being a compensatory strategy, and being enough exactly how you are. And it ends with self-care and healing as an individual and also as a community.

 

 

If you find yourself being intrigued by Acceptance and Self-Compassion Topics, I strongly urge you to check out my most favorite authors and books on the topic (the links below are Amazon affiliate links, which means that I earn a small commission from books purchased with these links):

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What do I say to my suicidal loved one?

I had the great honor to participate in an Instagram discussion on Mental Health and suicide within the POC (person of color), in particular the Latinx community. Check out the instagram account @thestrangeisbeautiful for the full conversation. There were 3 topics and I picked #1 to respond to as a mental health professional.

Topic # 1:

Many people posted that they would like friends or family to check-in, visit them in-person regularly, or give support. Having been on both sides, I know it can be hard for me to listen to a friend struggling vent when I’m not feeling good, or just in general can trigger me too. Though I think it’s important for friends and family to be supportive, I think it’s important for those struggling to not feel that it is their friends and family’s 24/7 job to be there for them. There needs to be another resource or another type of person that can be available instead of having friends and family be fully responsible for another’s well being.

  1. Tell me your thoughts on this. (Disagree, agree and why. What other options can we offer? Do you know of different options?)
    It’s super important to have *safe and healthy* social support when you’re feeling depressed or suicidal. AND it’s also important for the depressed or suicidal person to receive professional help. While family and friends can be lifesavers and “good intentioned,” sometimes their advice can be very triggering or even invalidating to the person. “Don’t think like that,” “you know we love you, isn’t that enough?,” “you just need to ___.” I’ve worked with a lot of families and clients who simply don’t understand depression, even if they’ve gone through it themselves. So if someone is going to seek family and friends to talk to about this very complex issue, then pick someone who is completely safe and validating. If you don’t have anyone like that then please seek professional help. And if that professional isn’t completely safe and validating, then go find another one. Finding safe and validating people can be a lot of work and yet so worth it at the same time. They are the ones that feel comfortable just listening without giving advice. When you find them in family/friends they are the ones that can simply hug you, stroke your hair, and give you a bag of hot cheetos, un te de manzanilla, una sopita because they know that will put a smile on your face and their oh so healing powers. They will not try to change you, but they will provide you with safety to be in your sadness and simply be there with you. Like with any other life threatening illness, loved ones suffer too. It can be emotionally taxing to receive calls from a suicidal loved one, because they worry and might not know how to help. Also if there is a history of self-harm or suicide attempts it increases the worry ten-fold. This is where seeking therapy can be a good option for you. There is a wonderful treatment called Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) that was created for suicidal  and self-harming individuals. I highly recommend it. It has several components: 1) weekly Individual therapy focused on reducing suicide and self harm by building a life worth living, 2) skills group that focuses on things you can do to understand and manage your feelings, 3) Crisis coaching phone calls with the therapist when the person is actively suicidal and is agreeing to receive help/ideas for coping, 4) the therapist attends a weekly team with other DBT therapists for support and consultation. It’s a big commitment for both the client and the therapist and it’s life changing. For adolescents, the model has been adapted slightly to have the parents participate in the skills group with the teens. Here family members also learn how to be supportive, validate and be a coach for the teen when they’re going through something. To answer the initial question, I do think that it’s a balance of seeking out social support and also committing to being safe (here I mean, don’t commit suicide or self-harm). Loved ones and even therapists burnout when the person they are helping are still harming themselves. If you call someone for help, or are responding to their check-in, please agree to take the help they offer. I know this is hard when depression is driving the car and it’s the singe best thing that’s going to help you and your relationship with this loved one.
  2. What language is appropriate to use as a friend: I wrote a blog article on what to say to someone who is depressed to encourage them to heal and go to therapy https://www.sofiamendozalcsw.com/what-to-say/yourlovedoneisdepressed/. Some snapshots are: Start with validating their emotions. Validation is a little like stating the obvious – which is why a lot of people skip it, but people who are depressed really need to feel like their voice is heard or struggle is being seen. This is where you can say things like:
    • You are in so much pain right now.
    • I know this is really hard for you.
    • “You went through something really traumatic. It makes sense that you’re in pain.”
    • “I’m so sorry you’re suffering like this.”

Introducing the idea of a therapist.

    • “You deserve to have someone who is unbiased, non-judgmental and in your corner – on your side.”
    • “A therapist doesn’t have all the history you and I do.”
    • “A therapist has a lot more tools and training than I do to help you.”
    • If they say they’ve tried therapy before and it didn’t work, encourage them to try with another therapist. Not all therapists will be helpful or the right fit. They can definitely shop around until finding “the one” for this situation, in this moment (sometimes different issues require different expertise).

Why it all matters. We all deserve unconditional compassion. Compassion can sound like:

    • “Mija, you deserve to heal appropriately.”
    • “Your life is worth saving”
    • “Comadre, you matter”
    • “Compadre, you deserve to feel free to express yourself.”
    • “Amor, you deserve to be free of your depression.”
    • “You deserve to work through this issue without fear of judgment or that people will get offended.”
    • “You deserve to self-care. You take care of so many other people. You need someone just for you.”
    • “You don’t have to be alone in your suffering. A therapist can help you hold it appropriately.”
    • Respira, Amor

For those who are depressed and want to know how you can talk to your loved ones about your depression:

Simply, Tell them what you need.

  • “I’m really stuck in my pain right now.”
  • Let them understand the difference (if there is one) about having thoughts of wanting to be dead and actually planning a suicide attempt. Rightfully so, suicide scares everyone.
  • “I’m calling just to hear you tell me that you love me because I’m really struggling right now and having thoughts of wanting to be dead.”
  • “I need help. I will take the help you offer.”
  • “I just need you to listen. don’t ask me questions.”
  • “Just tell me that you hear/love/support me.”
  • “I don’t need advice. I just want to vent.”
  • “Please check in on me every Friday if you don’t hear from me.”

I get asked a lot about how to seek help.

  • If your loved one has insurance, there is a ‘member services’ phone number on it (most are on the back). Ask for their mental health services department. I recommend talking to a live person to have them email a list of their providers that are close to the home or work (or the city the person wants to seek services in). They can then cross reference that list online by searching the therapist and a website.
  • You can also type in the search engine of your choice, “Therapist in (city)” or by zipcode.
  • psychologytoday.com is an online therapist directory that you can filter by location and insurance. The website has a feature where you can send therapist profiles to people by email.
  • If your loved one is an adult you won’t be able to call a therapist for them. The person seeking services has to make the call and schedule their appointment
  • Most therapists will offer a free 15 minute phone consultation to discuss the situation and answer any questions they might have about therapy, style, and see if together they a fit for each other.
  • In Los Angeles County, we are super lucky. There are lots of programs that focus on prevention, early intervention that the uninsured  and even undocumented folks can take advantage of. Call the LA County Department of Mental Health Hotline at  (800) 854-7771 to ask about services near you or for them to come to their home to evaluate them.
  • If you’re unsure about your loved one’s safety. You can always call 911 and ask them to conduct a welfare check at your loved one’s location. You must have the location handy. Some law enforcement agencies have mental health teams that can go out and assist with the evaluations. Regardless though, police officers have the ability to take individuals to the ER for a more thorough mental health evaluation.
  • You can also offer to take them to the nearest ER or to their medical professional for an evaluation.
  • @melaninandmentalhealth and @therapyforlatinx are wonderful resources for POC. Maybe all us POC therapists can also add #POCtherapist on our posts? I’ll definitely go back and add that to mine.
  • Primary Care physicians, schools (all of them), Human Resource Offices, Police Departments all have agencies/people who they refer to for mental health issues
  • Our Latinx People ARE seeking mental health resources. Yes, tias/tios, abuelitas, primos, little sisters, POC teachers/therapists/professionals… I know because I see them. I’ve seen them in community mental health clinics with and without insurance, and also in my private office. OUR GENTE is looking to heal generational trauma, abuse, perfectionism, self-harm, depression, anxiety, etc. I’m so proud of them (and even me when I went to therapy too, my mom when she decided to get on anti-depressants, my family members who keep trying with different therapists and who argue with their psychiatrists, lol).
  • If you don’t want to do therapy, that’s ok too. But commit to life: the good, bad and ugly of it and find ways to make this life worth living. So if church helps you, then go. If it’s prayer, pray. If there’s anything you can commit to doubting, doubt the depression. Doubt the hopelessness. Doubt the unworthiness. Do ‘feel good’ things that bring your values and passion out. For some people it’s gardening, for others its cocinando pozole, ask people what makes them smile. Ask yourself and do it. Go to a healer/curandera and follow their recommendations, see if that helps. The running theme here is “do it.” Do something that gets you close to your passions, values or goals. Ultimately, that’s what heals.
  • Our people/we ALL deserve to heal. Trust in , “Sana, sana, colita de rana. Si no sana hoy, sanara mañana.” Trust in that mañana, over and over by getting closer the things and people you love.

 

Respira, Amor

Sofia Mendoza, LCSW @mendingrootstherapy

Here are some book recommendations that focus on suffering, acceptance and healing. I also added DBT skills manuals that you can use to focus on behavior change. They are best supplemented and discussed with a DBT therapist. These are amazon affiliate links, which means that if you buy from this direct link, I earn a percentage that I use to purchase more books to review.

 


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Your loved one is depressed. How to tell them about therapy

 

You’re sitting with your BFF (best friend forever) as she’s depressed, in tears and describing her extremely painful situation(s). You feel so much for her and also feel frozen. You don’t know what to do or say to make her feel better. All you know is you want her pain to end and don’t know how. 

This is an all too common scenario among those with close relationships. For us empaths (“How to know if you’re an empath“), it can be incredibly hard to sit with challenging emotions or a problem that we can’t “fix” (even if we are 1000% certain we know how to fix it).

So, what the heck do you say to someone who has a lot of pain and several problems that need solving? By now you all know that this is a therapist’s blog and I’m going to recommend that you encourage them to seek professional help with a therapist. You also know that your loved one would benefit from therapy (whether or not you’ve gone to therapy yourself). You know that these problems are obviously too big for you and he to carry alone. And perhaps you can feel the toll it’s taken on your relationship or even your own well-being as a loved one.

“So how do I tell my loved ones to get therapy for depression (or any other mental illness), without stigmatizing or offending them?”

I get this question by clients, other friends, family members and and even fellow therapists ALL. THE. TIME.

Below is my list of things to remember and ways to tell a loved one that they’re in need of professional help.

  1. Start with validating their emotions. Validation is a little like stating the obvious – which is why a lot of people skip it, but people who are depressed really need to feel like their voice is heard or struggle is being seen. This is where you can say things like:
    • You are in so much pain right now.
    • I know this is really hard for you.
    • “You went through something really traumatic. It makes sense that you’re in pain.”
    • “I’m so sorry you’re suffering like this.”
  2. Introducing the idea of a therapist.
    • “You deserve to have someone who is unbiased, non-judgmental and in your corner – on your side.”
    • “A therapist doesn’t have all the history you and I do.”
    • “A therapist has a lot more tools and training than I do to help you.”
    • (For my fellow therapists) “Even though I’m a therapist, I can’t be your therapist. I’m your sister/brother/friend/partner/wife/husband. My love is not professional. Ethically, I can’t be your therapist. My advice is biased — all full of love for you.”
    • If they say they’ve tried therapy before and it didn’t work, encourage them to try with another therapist. Not all therapists will be helpful or the right fit. They can definitely shop around until finding “the one” for this situation, in this moment (sometimes different issues require different expertise).
  3. Why it all matters. We all deserve unconditional compassion.
    • “You deserve to heal appropriately.”
    • “You deserve to feel free to express yourself.”
    • “You deserve to be free of your depression.”
    • “You deserve to work through this issue without fear of judgment or that people will get offended.”
    • “You deserve to self-care. You take care of so many other people. You need someone just for you.”
    • “You don’t have to be alone in your suffering. A therapist can help you hold it appropriately.”
  4. How to seek referrals
    • If your loved one has insurance, there is a ‘member services’ phone number on it (most are on the back). Ask for their mental health services department. I recommend talking to a live person to have them email a list of their providers that are close to the home or work (or the city the person wants to seek services in). They can then cross reference that list online by searching the therapist and a website.
    • You can also type in the search engine of your choice, “Therapist in (city)” or by zipcode.
    • psychologytoday.com is an online therapist directory that you can filter by location and insurance.
    • If your loved one is an adult you won’t be able to call a therapist for them. The person seeking services has to make the call and schedule their appointment
  5. Resources and gifts that inspire healing. I have a Resources page with a variety of books on different issues to heal from. I also wrote an article focused on Mental Health Gifts that inspire healing.
  6. What about you? Yes, YOU! As a friend or family member, it can be difficult to hold all this pain and responsibility alone. If you’re finding yourself in a lot of emotional crises with family or friends, it’s critical for you to get your own support too. You might be having a lot of guilt feelings or a high degree of expectation for how you help them. It’s hard sitting with uncertainty and pain. Feelings and core beliefs of helplessness contribute to burnout, stress and your own ideas of what it means to be a true friend/family member. Sort it out with someone who is trained to work with burnout, self-care, and families afflicted by mental illness. Family Connections is a great source of support for loved ones of Borderline Personality Disorder or Emotion Dysregulation in general. I was trained by them and have implemented this support group in Spanish at Harbor UCLA. It made all the difference in loved ones being able to place appropriate boundaries, self-care and understanding for their family members. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is another great resource to anyone who has been impacted by mental illness (individuals and friends/family members). Check out these posts I wrote about convincing ourselves to self-care and basic self-care practices. They were written for parents, but the message applies to anyone shouldering the responsibility of helping in general. Implement the #meforwe or self(care)ish message if it helps.

   

7. Crises. If you feel that your loved one is a danger to themselves or others, I strongly urge you to call 911 or take them to the nearest emergency room. In Los Angeles County you can also call Department of Mental Health’s Access Hotline at (800) 854-7771 where you can speak to a mental health staff member and who can help with sending out the Psychiatric Mobile Response Team (PMRT) to your home to evaluate someone (wait times vary). Lots of police departments also have Mental Health Evaluations Teams that go out and conduct welfare checks to someone’s home and can also evaluate for a psychiatric hospitalization. Check with your local police station about this resource.

Lastly, I’d like to make myself available as a resource. After being trained in various family support models, I appreciate the love, struggle and compassion of family members. Feel free to contact me at info@sofiamendozalcsw.com to schedule a 15 minute consult to determine if you would benefit from therapy and support of your own.

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15 Statements to Convince Yourself to Self-Care: A love letter to all parents

 

“What to say” Series:

Last week I wrote a blog post on 20 easy 5-minute self-care ideas for parents. Today, I continue the conversation in the guest post, “15 Statements to Convince Yourself to Self-Care: A love letter to all Parents” on The Productive Parent website. I provide 15 statements and quotes that parents can say to themselves when our guilt, shame or other unpleasant emotions get in the way of taking care for ourselves. I practice saying those statements to myself on a daily basis when I notice feeling overwhelmed and just not feeling well as I attempt to juggle all my roles.

Many parents are notorious for putting their needs last, and these 15 statements help to remind us of focusing on our well-being for our children and to model self-care for them too.

Since I don’t want to mislead you, I’ll continue the list and add 16 – 30 self-care quotes here.

16. You can’t collect water from an empty well.

17. Self-care allows me to reduce my stress little by little.

18. Self-care will help me calm down.

19. I make the wisest decisions when I’m calm.

20. A car stops running when it’s out of gas.

21. If I don’t take care of myself now, I run the risk of becoming sick later.

22. My children need to see me being good to myself.

23. Self-care = self-compassion.

24. I deserve care and compassion, just like my children do.

25. If your compassion does not include yourself, it is incomplete. – Jack Kornfield

26. Sometimes the most important thing in a whole day is the rest we take between two deep breaths. – Etty Hillesum

27. “If I am not good to myself, how can I expect others to be good to me?” – Maya Angelou

28. “Setting boundaries is a way of caring for myself. It doesn’t make me mean, selfish, or uncaring because I don’t do things your way. I care about me too.” ― Christine Morgan

29. “When you recover or discover something that nourishes your soul and brings joy, care enough about yourself to make room for it in your life.”– Jean Shinoda Bolen

30.If you want to do your best for future generations of humanity, for your friends and family, you must begin by taking good care of yourself.”― Tarthang Tulku Rinpoche

I’m curious to know, what are your favorite self-care quotes? I’d love to make a list of 100 self-care statements for everyone to reference.

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“I’m not bad…”

Ever want to shout out at a naughty child, “Stop it, you’re being BAD?” You are definitely not alone. Parenting, caregiving, teaching children requires lots of patience and skill especially when they are not complying.

Growing up, I knew a lot of kids who heard this from teachers, siblings, and well-meaning neighbors. These kids didn’t listen, were very hyperactive, and above all, mischievous. I didn’t like some of them. I was friends with some. Later, I would come to find out that kids aren’t bad, they just engage in behaviors that are either not expected, liked, or accepted for the situation.

Which is why when one of my daughter’s first words were, “bad! bad!” I cringed and as I was trying to tolerate the shame of having my daughter say this (and with conviction), I of course, yelled at my husband. You see, in her first year of life, my husband would constantly tell our chihuahua, Millie that she was “bad! bad!” when she would bark at strangers, family members, the baby, nothing, or a knock on tv (she’s just protective!). My family would laugh at me when I would say, “Millie’s not bad, she just makes poor choices.” Yes, these are the conversations in the home of a therapist. My point was that Millie was responding to her internal alarm, her “flight and fight” response telling her to protect us and the home. And while she has a lot to learn about life and real and perceived danger, we as her parents need to train her to do better, instead of making her feel as though she’s bad. Every time I hear someone say “bad person” it’s like nails on a chalkboard for me. Mainly because I know how much people suffer when they believe it about themselves.

In my work, the “I’m a bad person” core belief comes up quite frequently. A lot of people believe they are inherently BAD. When we examine this belief and its history on their life, we find that the message (or “seed” as I like to refer to it as), “You’re bad” was planted back in childhood. It might have been an innocent, non-ill intentioned experience, and it kept being reinforced through time and other experiences. I tell my clients that these reinforced experiences are like oxygen, water and sunlight… all the things that a core belief and “tree” needs to grow and thrive. Then people start to believe the message and can develop assumptions about themselves and act accordingly. Two extremes can be: 1) continue to act that belief out, ex: “Since I’m bad and everyone knows it, I will continue to do bad things.” and/or ; 2) do everything possible to combat this belief or “inherent trait”, ex: “I have to go above and beyond to do nice things so that no one catches on and sees that I’m actually really a bad person.” Such behaviors can cause people to suffer and ultimately, behave in ways that are opposite to their values or goals.

Now that my daughter is 3.5 years old, I see her personality flourishing, how she developmentally appropriately pushes boundaries (and bedtime, and more snacks, or juice after brushing teeth, or stalling to clean up toys and on and on), and asserts her independence (no, I do it!),  and how she is also starting to hold on to certain beliefs about herself and even others, like Millie = bad. It won’t be before long that an experience plants a seed about how her behavior is a direct reflection of something or someone she inherently is, even though it really isn’t.

And so this post is for her, for me, for you and your children. Let this image be a reminder that kids aren’t bad, they’re just:

Hungry. Tired. Bored. Overly Stimulated. Super excited. Frustrated. Delirious. Loopy. Sad. Having bad memories (trauma reactions look a lot like hyperactivity in kids – more on this in a later post). Legitimately not listening to you or the directions.

Sure it frustrates the hell out of us parents or caregivers (or aunts, teachers, sitters, cousins, grandparents), mainly because we’re:

Hungry. Tired. Bored. Overly Stimulated. Super excited. Frustrated. Delirious. Loopy. Sad. Having bad memories (trauma reactions look a lot like irritability in adults – more on this in a later post). Legitimately not listening to them or the directions they have for us.

And that doesn’t make us bad either.

Hey, parenting, teaching, caregiving – it’s all hard. Every day is a whole new ballgame. Be kind to yourself and those kiddos.

Stay tuned for the next post focusing on what you can do to help with some of these behaviors.

Resources:

If you feel triggered by this article and are in need of some immediate resources, I urge you to contact:

  • 911 or go to your nearest ER if you feel you a danger to yourself or others
  • 211 – in LA County it’s the social service directory for grief groups, therapy resources, housing, and more. It’s also online, google, “211”
  • LA County Access hotline for a psychiatric evaluation wherever you are located. The ACCESS/HOTLINE Phone number is : 1-800-854-7771. ACCESS operates 24 hours/day, 7 days/week as the entry point for mental health services in Los Angeles County.
  • Email me at info@sofiamendozalcsw.com if you’d like to inquire about an appointment with me in the Long Beach area. I can also help connect you to other therapists if you live elsewhere.
  • If you would like to access your insurance mental health benefits, there should be a Member Phone number on the back of your insurance card. Ask them for their list of approved therapists. They can also email it to you, making it easy to cross reference the list on www.psychologytoday.com where you can check their profiles out.

Thank you for reading. Follow me on Instagram under @mendingrootstherapy to get updates about new articles, quotes and other musings on mental health.

 

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What to Say: It’s OK to not be OK

‘WHAT TO SAY’ Series:

Recently mental health awareness efforts on social and public media have been growing exponentially. It makes me super happy that folks are talking about it from a public health perspective and making it’s way to people’s instagram, Facebook and Pinterest accounts and even music playlists as different artists are writing and singing about mental illness. When I teach about mental health and psychotherapy to social work students, I tell them that mental health is like the “air that we breathe.” When we are finding ourselves feeling depressed or anxious, we can develop tunnel vision and focus on the most negative aspects of life and make similar interpretations of those messages we receive.

When loved ones are suffering, it can be hard to find the right words to say. Truth is that there are no right words that can stop someone’s pain. At times, we have our own expectations about making others feel better and when we know we can’t, we avoid the suffering person all together. In my “what to say” series of cards and posts, I put this one together for my clients and loved ones. Sometimes letting people know that “It’s ok to not be ok” tells them that it’s ok to feel what they are feeling. And that is enough. You and your attention are enough to help someone feel heard. Try it one time this week with anyone of any age.

Resources:

If you feel triggered by this article and are in need of some immediate resources, I urge you to contact:

  • 911 or go to your nearest ER if you feel you a danger to yourself or others
  • 211 – in LA County it’s the social service directory for grief groups, therapy resources, housing, and more. It’s also online, google, “211”
  • LA County Access hotline for a psychiatric evaluation wherever you are located. The ACCESS/HOTLINE Phone number is : 1-800-854-7771. ACCESS operates 24 hours/day, 7 days/week as the entry point for mental health services in Los Angeles County.
  • Email me at info@sofiamendozalcsw.com if you’d like to inquire about an appointment with me in the Long Beach area. I can also help connect you to other therapists if you live elsewhere.
  • If you would like to access your insurance mental health benefits, there should be a Member Phone number on the back of your insurance card. Ask them for their list of approved therapists. They can also email it to you, making it easy to cross reference the list on www.psychologytoday.com where you can check their profiles out.

Thank you for reading. Follow me on Instagram under @mendingrootstherapy to get updates about new articles, quotes and other musings on mental health.

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