Tag: Therapy

Your loved one is depressed. How to tell them about therapy

 

You’re sitting with your BFF (best friend forever) as she’s depressed, in tears and describing her extremely painful situation(s). You feel so much for her and also feel frozen. You don’t know what to do or say to make her feel better. All you know is you want her pain to end and don’t know how. 

This is an all too common scenario among those with close relationships. For us empaths (“How to know if you’re an empath“), it can be incredibly hard to sit with challenging emotions or a problem that we can’t “fix” (even if we are 1000% certain we know how to fix it).

So, what the heck do you say to someone who has a lot of pain and several problems that need solving? By now you all know that this is a therapist’s blog and I’m going to recommend that you encourage them to seek professional help with a therapist. You also know that your loved one would benefit from therapy (whether or not you’ve gone to therapy yourself). You know that these problems are obviously too big for you and he to carry alone. And perhaps you can feel the toll it’s taken on your relationship or even your own well-being as a loved one.

“So how do I tell my loved ones to get therapy for depression (or any other mental illness), without stigmatizing or offending them?”

I get this question by clients, other friends, family members and and even fellow therapists ALL. THE. TIME.

Below is my list of things to remember and ways to tell a loved one that they’re in need of professional help.

  1. Start with validating their emotions. Validation is a little like stating the obvious – which is why a lot of people skip it, but people who are depressed really need to feel like their voice is heard or struggle is being seen. This is where you can say things like:
    • You are in so much pain right now.
    • I know this is really hard for you.
    • “You went through something really traumatic. It makes sense that you’re in pain.”
    • “I’m so sorry you’re suffering like this.”
  2. Introducing the idea of a therapist.
    • “You deserve to have someone who is unbiased, non-judgmental and in your corner – on your side.”
    • “A therapist doesn’t have all the history you and I do.”
    • “A therapist has a lot more tools and training than I do to help you.”
    • (For my fellow therapists) “Even though I’m a therapist, I can’t be your therapist. I’m your sister/brother/friend/partner/wife/husband. My love is not professional. Ethically, I can’t be your therapist. My advice is biased — all full of love for you.”
    • If they say they’ve tried therapy before and it didn’t work, encourage them to try with another therapist. Not all therapists will be helpful or the right fit. They can definitely shop around until finding “the one” for this situation, in this moment (sometimes different issues require different expertise).
  3. Why it all matters. We all deserve unconditional compassion.
    • “You deserve to heal appropriately.”
    • “You deserve to feel free to express yourself.”
    • “You deserve to be free of your depression.”
    • “You deserve to work through this issue without fear of judgment or that people will get offended.”
    • “You deserve to self-care. You take care of so many other people. You need someone just for you.”
    • “You don’t have to be alone in your suffering. A therapist can help you hold it appropriately.”
  4. How to seek referrals
    • If your loved one has insurance, there is a ‘member services’ phone number on it (most are on the back). Ask for their mental health services department. I recommend talking to a live person to have them email a list of their providers that are close to the home or work (or the city the person wants to seek services in). They can then cross reference that list online by searching the therapist and a website.
    • You can also type in the search engine of your choice, “Therapist in (city)” or by zipcode.
    • psychologytoday.com is an online therapist directory that you can filter by location and insurance.
    • If your loved one is an adult you won’t be able to call a therapist for them. The person seeking services has to make the call and schedule their appointment
  5. Resources and gifts that inspire healing. I have a Resources page with a variety of books on different issues to heal from. I also wrote an article focused on Mental Health Gifts that inspire healing.
  6. What about you? Yes, YOU! As a friend or family member, it can be difficult to hold all this pain and responsibility alone. If you’re finding yourself in a lot of emotional crises with family or friends, it’s critical for you to get your own support too. You might be having a lot of guilt feelings or a high degree of expectation for how you help them. It’s hard sitting with uncertainty and pain. Feelings and core beliefs of helplessness contribute to burnout, stress and your own ideas of what it means to be a true friend/family member. Sort it out with someone who is trained to work with burnout, self-care, and families afflicted by mental illness. Family Connections is a great source of support for loved ones of Borderline Personality Disorder or Emotion Dysregulation in general. I was trained by them and have implemented this support group in Spanish at Harbor UCLA. It made all the difference in loved ones being able to place appropriate boundaries, self-care and understanding for their family members. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is another great resource to anyone who has been impacted by mental illness (individuals and friends/family members). Check out these posts I wrote about convincing ourselves to self-care and basic self-care practices. They were written for parents, but the message applies to anyone shouldering the responsibility of helping in general. Implement the #meforwe or self(care)ish message if it helps.

   

7. Crises. If you feel that your loved one is a danger to themselves or others, I strongly urge you to call 911 or take them to the nearest emergency room. In Los Angeles County you can also call Department of Mental Health’s Access Hotline at (800) 854-7771 where you can speak to a mental health staff member and who can help with sending out the Psychiatric Mobile Response Team (PMRT) to your home to evaluate someone (wait times vary). Lots of police departments also have Mental Health Evaluations Teams that go out and conduct welfare checks to someone’s home and can also evaluate for a psychiatric hospitalization. Check with your local police station about this resource.

Lastly, I’d like to make myself available as a resource. After being trained in various family support models, I appreciate the love, struggle and compassion of family members. Feel free to contact me at info@sofiamendozalcsw.com to schedule a 15 minute consult to determine if you would benefit from therapy and support of your own.

When a Parent or Loved One Goes to Jail

How do I tell the children their parent or loved one went to jail? 

Book Review: The Night Dad Went to Jail by Melissa Higgins

Dad went to jail

The Night Dad Went to Jail is a children’s book has been on my radar to check out for a long time since I come across several children and teens whose parent went to jail. Having a parent or loved one go to jail can be extremely traumatic and jarring for most children. It’s a big transition that can come with confusion, shame, fear, worry and sadness. This book does a really nice job of normalizing the feelings that children have when faced with this difficult situation. I like that it also folds in statistics about parents in jail/prison and recommendations for the person reading the book to the child.

Another positive aspect of the book is that it incorporates interactions with police, social workers, therapists, and a caregiver — all supporting the child. Additionally, the book is written in the first person, the eyes of this young bunny. It very much reads like a narrative that is often used in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TFCBT) — an exposure based trauma treatment where children and teens draw or write out the details of their trauma and work with their therapist to modify negative thoughts or beliefs about the event, themselves or their future. As a certified TFCBT therapist, it was heartwarming to read this book which provides great information, recommendations, and above all, providing normalization for kiddos’ and their parents’ reactions in the face of such a challenging situation.

What to say: Depending on the child’s age and their level of understanding, you will have to craft out an explanation in their own language or phrasing. Most children know about cause and effect, so keeping it as simple without too many details of the actual crime could suffice in the beginning. A sample explanation can be: “Your mom or dad (or the name of the loved one) may have broken the law (or rules) and the police are asking him/her questions. Sometimes these things take a while — maybe some days, maybe months. If mom/dad/loved one broke a rule/law, we might not see them for a while. Depending on the developmental stage the child is in, sometimes they believe that they are at fault or to blame. Make sure to reassure the child that adults are responsible for their own behavior. You can also distinguish the behavior from the character of the person if necessary. Such as, “Mom/dad/loved one is not a bad person, he/she broke a rule/law. He/she loves you very much and misses you too.” Encourage them to talk with you about their fears, concerns, or any thoughts and feelings they might be having. Above all, be willing and open to listening to them and validate their feelings (even if their thoughts might be distorted). Employ the “yes, and” communication rule in your vocabulary to help them see the validity of their emotions, and how sometimes they can be clouded by negative thoughts. An example can be, “I know that you’re sad and feeling guilty about this being your fault, and mom/dad/loved one is an adult and all adults are responsible for their own behavior.”

Therapist tip: Sometimes children have a hard time opening up about a certain situation, feelings, or distressing topic. It can help to have a story read, told to them, or even watching a movie about another person going through the same or similar situation. It can get the very difficult conversation started.

Amazon Prime tip: If you have Amazon Prime, currently this book is listed as an unlimited free read and download on the Kindle app. That’s how I read it. But since I liked it so much, I’m going to buy it and keep it in my arsenal of books in the office.

If you believe that you or your child is struggling with a transition such as this one, feel free to contact me and we can set up a consultation session to discuss the specifics of your situation and how to tailor interventions.

 

To purchase or download the book for free, click on the image below:

 

 

*Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. You should also know that I stand by my recommendations as I read or use everything I recommend. The fees earned from Amazon.com go toward purchasing more books and materials used in my practice. 

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